What is periodontal treatment?

Periodontics or periodontology studies supporting structures of teeth – gum tissue, periodontal ligament and bone, and its related diseases and conditions. Periodontal treatments are employed to treat periodontal diseases, the most common of which being plaque-induced inflammatory conditions, such as gingivitis and periodontitis. Periodontal treatments are divided into two categories – non-surgical and surgical.

Non-surgical treatments

These procedures are actually more common than most people thought they are, and are widely recommended to ensure long-lasting dental health. Regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are highly recommended as these diseases may not have warning signs. Non-surgical periodontal treatments include:

  • Periodical dental checkup and cleaning

    Your dentists will remove the plaque and tartar (hardened plaque on the tooth surface and cannot be removed with flossing and brushing alone) found during dental checkups. Should signs of periodontal disease be present, professional dental cleaning more than twice-a-year will be recommended.

  • Scaling and root planing

    This is a deep-cleaning, nonsurgical procedure often used alongside local anesthesia, which cleans plaque and tartar between the gums and the teeth right down to the roots, by either scraping them away (scaling) and smoothening rough spots at root are made smooth (planing). This procedure is employed when the underside of gums are diagnosed to plaque and tartar under the gums requires removal, before severity worsens.

  • Laser treatments

    Simply put, laser treatment is a derivation of conventional methods of plague and tartar removal, using laser instead of conventional scaling and root planning tools. Purported benefits include minimal tissue damage and swelling, less bleeding, sterilization of the treatment area, reduced post-treatment discomfort.

Surgical

These treatments are employed when the abovementioned non-surgical procedures prove inadequate to treating gum problems, due to damage to underlying bone and/or tissue are in advanced stages, in addition to plague and tartar problems.

  • Flap/pocket reduction surgery

    During this procedure the gums are lifted back and removing build up of tartar latching on the exposed parts of the tooth. The gums are later placed back so that the tissue fits enough to maintain tooth stability.

  • Bone and/or tissue grafting

    These procedures involve grafting bones and/or soft tissues onto the diseased site in case of severe bone loss and/or gum tissues receded too much. Bones can be natural or synthetic bone, and tissue taken from other sites like the roof of the mouth.

  • Guided tissue regeneration

    This is applied usually after use of bone grafts to stimulate bone and gum tissue growth, keeping tissue from growing into bone areas to ensure proper regeneration capable of supporting the tooth.

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What is periodontal treatment?

Periodontics or periodontology studies supporting structures of teeth – gum tissue, periodontal ligament and bone, and its related diseases and conditions. Periodontal treatments are employed to treat periodontal diseases, the most common of which being plaque-induced inflammatory conditions, such as gingivitis and periodontitis. Periodontal treatments are divided into two categories – non-surgical and surgical.

Non-surgical treatments

These procedures are actually more common than most people thought they are, and are widely recommended to ensure long-lasting dental health. Regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are highly recommended as these diseases may not have warning signs. Non-surgical periodontal treatments include:

  • Periodical dental checkup and cleaning

    Your dentists will remove the plaque and tartar (hardened plaque on the tooth surface and cannot be removed with flossing and brushing alone) found during dental checkups. Should signs of periodontal disease be present, professional dental cleaning more than twice-a-year will be recommended.

  • Scaling and root planing

    This is a deep-cleaning, nonsurgical procedure often used alongside local anesthesia, which cleans plaque and tartar between the gums and the teeth right down to the roots, by either scraping them away (scaling) and smoothening rough spots at root are made smooth (planing). This procedure is employed when the underside of gums are diagnosed to plaque and tartar under the gums requires removal, before severity worsens.

  • Laser treatments

    Simply put, laser treatment is a derivation of conventional methods of plague and tartar removal, using laser instead of conventional scaling and root planning tools. Purported benefits include minimal tissue damage and swelling, less bleeding, sterilization of the treatment area, reduced post-treatment discomfort.

Surgical

These treatments are employed when the abovementioned non-surgical procedures prove inadequate to treating gum problems, due to damage to underlying bone and/or tissue are in advanced stages, in addition to plague and tartar problems.

  • Flap/pocket reduction surgery

    During this procedure the gums are lifted back and removing build up of tartar latching on the exposed parts of the tooth. The gums are later placed back so that the tissue fits enough to maintain tooth stability.

  • Bone and/or tissue grafting

    These procedures involve grafting bones and/or soft tissues onto the diseased site in case of severe bone loss and/or gum tissues receded too much. Bones can be natural or synthetic bone, and tissue taken from other sites like the roof of the mouth.

  • Guided tissue regeneration

    This is applied usually after use of bone grafts to stimulate bone and gum tissue growth, keeping tissue from growing into bone areas to ensure proper regeneration capable of supporting the tooth.

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